The Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet that took place in Carbonado on August 9, 1924

In this photo, a boys’ team is receiving instruction regarding first aid. The team was likely a Boy Scout troop who through qualifications had been chosen to represent their town

The Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet that took place in Carbonado on August 9, 1924 featured several divisions of competitors, including children. The purpose was to encourage the development of safer practices in the underground coal mining. Teams from Bellingham, Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett competed at the event held in the host town of Carbonado. In this photo, a boys’ team is receiving instruction regarding first aid. The team was likely a Boy Scout troop who through qualifications had been chosen to represent their town. As an outgrowth of events like this, first aid training was introduced into school curriculum. In the following year’s Annual Report, Chief Coal Mine Inspector William Reese wrote, “It should be noted in this connection that classes in First Aid training have been established in the public schools of Burnett, Black Diamond, Carbonado, and Newcastle, which is, as far as we have been able to learn the first attempt at training our children in First Aid to the injured. We regard this as one of the most important movements of the day and deserving of our earnest support and commendations. This is an important step and should spread rapidly throughout all institutions of learning of the country, an essential to a well balance community and nation.” In time, first aid training did spread beyond coal mining communities. This photo #A467 by Commercial Photo Service of Tacoma comes courtesy of Jerry & Lynda English, with caption information provided by JoAnne Matsumura, an Issaquah researcher.